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scientists-disagree

Why Scientists Disagree Second EditionA new book from the Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change (NIPCC), titled Why Scientists Disagree about Global Warming, was released on November 30, 2015, the first day of the United Nations’ twenty-first conference of the parties (COP-21) taking place in Paris.

Why Scientists Disagree, by Craig D. Idso, Robert M. Carter, and S. Fred Singer, explains why the claim of “scientific consensus” on the causes and consequences of climate change is without merit. The authors comprehensively and specifically rebut the surveys and studies used to support claims of a consensus. They then summarize evidence showing disagreement, identify four reasons why scientists disagree about global warming, and then provide a detailed survey of the physical science of global warming based on the authors’ previous work.

Why Scientists Disagree is the eighth publication produced by NIPCC, an international panel of nongovernment scientists and scholars who have come together to present a comprehensive, authoritative, and realistic assessment of the science and economics of global warming.

Whereas the reports of the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warn of a dangerous human effect on climate, NIPCC concludes the human effect is likely to be small relative to natural variability, and whatever small warming is likely to occur will produce benefits as well as costs. NIPCC is sponsored by three nonprofit organizations: the Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change, the Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP), and The Heartland Institute.

This volume, like past NIPCC reports, is edited and published by the staff of The Heartland Institute, a national nonprofit research and educational organization newly relocated from Chicago to suburban Arlington Heights, Illinois. It is based on a chapter in a forthcoming much larger examination of the climate change debate to be titled Climate Change Reconsidered II: Benefits and Costs of Fossil Fuels. That volume will finish the three-volume Climate Change Reconsidered II series, totaling some 3,000 pages and reporting the findings of more than 4,000 peer-reviewed articles on climate change.

scientists-disagree

Front Matter (Preface, Table of Contents, and Key Findings)
Introduction
Chapter 1. No Consensus
Chapter 2. Why Scientists Disagree
Chapter 3 Scientific Method vs. Political Science
Chapter 4. Flawed Projections
Chapter 5. False Postulates
Chapter 6. Unreliable Circumstantial Evidence
Chapter 7. Policy Implications
Conclusion
End Matter (About the Authors, About NIPCC, About The Heartland Institute)

Links2

Click here for free PDF of the entire book

BiologicalImpacts

The second volume of three in the second wave of the Climate Change Reconsidered series, Climate Change Reconsidered II: Biological Impacts, was released on April 9, 2014. The first volume of the CCR-II series, Physical Science, was released in 2013 and is available on this Web site at this link. The final volume, Benefits and Costs of Fossil Fuels, will be released chapter-by-chapter in digital form on this site in November and December 2015.

Climate Change Reconsidered II: Biological Impacts constitutes an independent, comprehensive, and authoritative report on the impacts of climate change on plants, terrestrial animals, aquatic life, and human well-being.

This volume is the fifth in a series of scholarly reports produced by the Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change (NIPCC), an international network of climate scientists sponsored by three nonprofit organizations: the Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change, the Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP), and The Heartland Institute. Previous volumes in the Climate Change Reconsidered series were published in 2008, 2009, 2011, and 2013. Those volumes — along with separate executive summaries for the second, third, and fourth reports — are available for free online on this site. Find them in the right sidebar.

Whereas the reports of the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warn of a dangerous human effect on climate, NIPCC concludes the human effect is likely to be small relative to natural variability, and whatever small warming is likely to occur will produce benefits as well as costs.

BiologicalImpacts

One page Summary
Summary for Policymakers

Front Matter (Foreword, Table of Contents, Executive Summary, and Introduction)
Chapter 1. Carbon Dioxide, Plants and Soils
Chapter 2. Plant Characteristics
Chapter 3. Plants Under Stress
Chapter 4. Earth’s Vegetative Future
Chapter 5. Terrestrial Animals
Chapter 6. Aquatic Life
Chapter 7. Human Health
Appendix 1: Acronyms
Appendix 2: Authors, Contributors, and Reviewers
Appendix 3: Plant Dry Weight Responses to Atmospheric CO2 Enrichment
Appendix 4: Plant Photosynthesis Responses to Atmospheric CO2 Enrichment

 

CCR2-Small-Science

Cover

Climate Change Reconsidered II: Physical Science is an independent, comprehensive, and authoritative report on the current state of climate science published in October 2013. It is the fourth in a series of scholarly reports produced by the Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change (NIPCC), an international network of climate scientists sponsored by three nonprofit organizations: the Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change, the Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP), and The Heartland Institute.

The Summary for Policymakers was written in collaboration with the lead authors and approved by them. Because it is aimed at a larger popular audience than the book, it adds a discussion of the scientific method and the precautionary principle, a brief summary and critical analysis of each of the IPCC’s main lines of argument, and a brief set of recommendations for policymakers. We also recommend you review the separate Executive Summary.

Previous volumes in the Climate Change Reconsidered series were published in 2008, 2009, and 2011. Those volumes along with separate executive summaries for the second and third reports are available for free online on this site. Find them on the right sidebar.

Whereas the reports of the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warn of a dangerous human effect on climate, NIPCC concludes the human effect is likely to be small relative to natural variability, and whatever small warming is likely to occur will produce benefits as well as costs.

Climate Change Reconsidered II consists of three parts: Part One titled Physical Science, Part Two titled Biological Impacts, and Part Three titled Benefits and Costs of Fossil Fuels. Part One was released on September 17-18, 2013 in Chicago, Illinois USA. Additional release events took place the following weeks in Washington, DC, New York, Florida, St. Louis, England, Germany, Holland, and California. Part Two was released on April 9, 2014. Part Three will be released chapter-by-chapter on this site in November and December 2015.

CCR2-Small-Science

Foreward and Preface
Executive Summary
Chapter 1. Global Climate Models
Chapter 2. Forcings and Feedbacks
Chapter 3. Solar Forcing of Climate
Chapter 4. Observations: Temperature
Chapter 5. Observations: The Cryosphere
Chapter 6. Observations: The Hydrosphere
Chapter 7. Observations: Extreme Weather
Appendix 1: Acronyms
Appendix 2: Authors Directory

Read More about this volume

2011InterimReport2

CCRIRBookThumb

In 2011, the Nongovernmental Panel on Climate Change (NIPCC) published Climate Change Reconsidered: 2011 Interim Report, a 400-page report containing summaries and analysis of scientific research published since the original 2009 edition of Climate Change Reconsidered. While not as comprehensive as the 2009 report, the Interim Report contains reviews of nearly 1,000 new research studies covering subjects including computer models, forcings and feedbacks, paeloclimate and recent temperatures, and more.

According to the report, “natural causes are very likely to be [the] dominant” cause of climate change that took place in the twentieth and at the start of the twenty-first centuries. “We are not saying anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHG) cannot produce some warming or have not in the past. Our conclusion is that the evidence shows they are not playing a substantial role.”

2011InterimReport2

Front Matter (Foreword, Table of Contents, Executive Summary, and Introduction)
Full Interim Report
Chapter 1: Climate Models and Their Limitations
Chapter 2: Forcings and Feedback
Chapter 3: Temperature
Chapter 4: Cryosphere
Chapter 5: Extreme Weather
Chapter 6: Terrestrial Animals
Chapter 7: Terrestrial Plants and Soils
Chapter 8: Aquatic Life
Chapter 9: Human Health Effects
Chapter 10: Economic and Other Policy
Appendix 1
Appendix 2

Links2

Click here to view the Executive Summary
Click here for free PDFs of the entire book or individual chapters.
Click here for Reviews of this book

2009NipccReport-Small

CCRBookStoreThumbThis 880-page rebuttal of the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), three years in the making, was released in June 2009 by The Heartland Institute. Coauthored and edited by S. Fred Singer, Ph.D., and Craig Idso, Ph.D. and produced with contributions and reviews by an international coalition of scientists, it provides an independent examination of the evidence available on the causes and consequences of climate change in the published, peer-reviewed literature examined without bias and selectivity. It includes many research papers ignored by the IPCC plus additional scientific results that became available after the IPCC deadline of May 2006.

2009NipccReport-Small

Front Matter (Foreword, Table of Contents, Executive Summary, and Introduction)
Chapter 1: Climate Models and Their Limitations
Chapter 2: Forcings and Feedback
Chapter 3: Temperature
Chapter 4: Cryosphere
Chapter 5: Extreme Weather
Chapter 6: Terrestrial Animals
Chapter 7: Terrestrial Plants and Soils
Chapter 8: Aquatic Life
Chapter 9: Human Health Effects
Appendix 1
Appendix 2
Appendix 3
Appendix 4
Full Report

Links2

Click here to view the Executive Summary
Click here
for free PDFs of the entire book or individual chapters.
Click here for Academic References to this book
Click here for Reviews of this book